Feature

Udder Delight

Green Lifestyle

When MooGoo founder Craig Jones whipped up a natural skin cream in his mother's kitchen eight years ago, he had no inkling of the business success that would follow.

MooGoo

Air-force-pilot-turned-cosmetic formulator, MooGoo founder Craig Jones.

- Advertisement -

When MooGoo founder Craig Jones whipped up a natural skin cream in his mother’s kitchen eight years ago, he had no inkling of the business success that would follow.

Searching for a treatment for psoriasis, Craig Jones’s mother found that the only thing that worked was a greasy udder cream used on dairy cows. So Jones, while home on a break from his job as an air force pilot, decided to improvise an alternative using only natural ingredients. His cream was a hit, and word of its effectiveness spread through central New South Wales, bringing requests from friends, family and neighbours.

Nicknamed ‘MooGoo’ by his wife, the name stuck and Jones developed more natural products to treat conditions such as dry scalps, eczema and nappy rash under the MooGoo moniker. Eight years on, his products are sold worldwide and in more than 1400 pharmacies and health food stores in Australia.

The MooGoo philosophy, Jones explains, is simple: “Our focus is to make products that actually work, using only natural ingredients.” This goal guides every decision about the ever-expanding range, which now boasts 35 products, including the best-selling eczema cream.

MooGoo products contain no palm oil, are edible, cruelty-free, certified carbon neutral and packaged in recyclable materials – and every ingredient is clearly listed. Yet Jones still wrestles with his environmental conscience. “It can be a conundrum because the best way to be an environmentalist is not to make anything at all,” he concedes. “You have to make choices. If you’re not using palm oil, do you use soybean oil even though it takes ten times the amount of land to cultivate? It’s hard to get a product that has good skin feel and works well without synthetic ingredients; we’re constantly looking for alternatives.”

Jones maintains his recent decision to walk away from the lucrative Chinese market and its requisite animal testing wasn’t difficult, but he was compelled to do more. “I get frustrated when I see people pointing the finger without coming up with an alternative to things like palm oil or animal testing,” he says. “We didn’t want to just sit back and complain, so we’re supporting the Humane Society International who are trying to educate testers and build the political will for an alternative.

“My brother calls me an anti-consumerist militant but I’m just not into maximising profit for the sake of it. I don’t agree with the fact that multinational cosmetic companies are making $12 billion a year – these corporations are becoming their own countries they’re so powerful.”

He muses, “I had absolutely no interest in cosmetics when we started but I think the more you learn about what’s in skincare products, the more you look for alternatives.”