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Couples willl be Steaming up Bathrooms This Valentine’s Day

It’s not only taps that are getting turned on in the bathroom, according to a new survey by Hansgrohe about the global showering habits.

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Showering in Pairs
With Valentine’s Day fast approaching, research has revealed that 47% of people across the globe are doubling their fun when it comes to showering by taking one with their partner. Whereas Brits perpetuate their prudish stereotype with only 32% of them showering together, almost twice as much South Africans admitted to regularly doing so (52%). On the other hand, British singletons (25%) outrun the global average of just 19% who shower with a new partner to woo while they wash. Top of the list are French and Italian singles with 28% each. Loved-up couples are driving the score internationally with 55% using their shower for romantic trysts. Dutch (64%) and South African lovers (62%) most indulge the pleasure of showering with in pairs.

The survey results also show that young lovers are more likely to favour a clinch behind the shower curtain this Valentine’s Day. More than half of 18-35 year olds regularly shower with someone else (54%), whereas just over a third of 45-55 year olds (35%) admitted to doing the same. Whereas in Europe, Asia and Africa highest scores of twosome pleasure under the shower can be found with 25-35 year olds (58%), US Americans are most likely to share their showers when they’re aged 18-25 years.

Yearning for Bigger Showers
The respondents also said that size matters - when it comes to picking the right shower. Over seven in ten (71%) are yearning for something bigger, driven by US Americans (82%), Chinese (80%) and Africans (79%) rather than Europeans (66%). However, 76% of them said they want more space in the shower for bottles rather than company.

Joachim Huber, Head of Hansgrohe Brand Marketing, said “It is clear from our survey that people are seeing the benefits of sensual showers. Our Rainmaker Select overhead showers and Raindance Select hand showers could provide a creative and exciting Valentine’s Day present for that special someone. Their large spray discs offer a generous and sensual water experience for both singles and couples. Our survey has shown that preferences for different spray types vary greatly across the globe – from massage sprays to gentle or powerful rain showers, to jet sprays covering neck and shoulders from above. Our products help our customers to ease their muscle tenseness, relax or get vitalised this Valentine’s Day – wherever they are in the world.”

Different Shower Habits Among Men and Women
The survey also explored how showering habits differ according to gender and relationship status. Couples living together prefer to use the bathroom as a retreat for calmness where they can relax alone (41%), a reason given much less often by lovers who don’t share a flat (32%). The results also showed that women (75%) are more likely to seek solitude in the shower compared to men (69%), with 52% of them saying they took refuge there for peace and quiet and 48% because they value their privacy in the bathroom.

On shower preferences, a significant group of men admitted to actually preferring a cold shower (8%), compared to only 4% of women. However, with an average of 13% US Americans are by far the coolest showerers (19% of men and 7% of women). Chinese women (13%) are the only women worldwide to be fonder of cold showers than their male counterparts (7%). However, two thirds of people (76%) seemed to be lukewarm about hot showers, saying they have them due to force of habit (59%) or because it helps them relax (41%).

Shared Bathrooms
The stereotype of prudish bathroom behaviour is also eliminated when looking at whether people share a bathroom as well as the shower. 23% of respondents say they’re not alone in the bathroom while showering, with only 4% attributing this to the typical rush hour bathroom congestion. The Dutch are by far most relaxed about another person’s presence in the bathroom when they take a shower: 35% indicate that they don’t mind sharing the room – compared to only 16% of Brits.