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Cat-proof fence

Green Lifestyle

There’s a new barrier that protects our native species; two cat-exclosure fences in the World Heritage-listed Kakadu National Park.

cat-fence

The cat-proof fence has a floppy top, which is designed to prevent feral cats from entering the reserve.

Credit: Northern Australia Hub, National Environmental Research Program

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You’ve heard about the rabbit-proof fence that runs along the border of Western Australia.

Now there’s a new barrier that protects our native species; two cat-exclosure fences have been built in World Heritage-listed Kakadu National Park.

Northern Territory government scientist Graeme Gillespie says feral cats are probably the biggest threats to native species in the state.

“Cat fences are not designed to be long-term conservation solutions, but we are hoping to find out whether native mammal populations bounce back in the absence of predators,” he says.

The two fenced sites cover 640,000 square metres, and are equipped with motion sensor cameras to monitor activity in the area.

Data collected will be compared with four other unfenced, monitored sites.

Gillespie acknowledges that lowering the cat population will be difficult and expensive, but is essential to save our native species.