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Happy chickens in the spotlight

G-Online

Now, you can watch live and unedited footage of happy free-range chooks to make sure that it’s up to the standards you demand.

Sunny Queen chickens

Chickens at the Sunny Queen Farms browsing in their free-range paddocks.

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Australians consume over 3.5 billion eggs every year, with nearly 80 per cent of them coming from intensive battery farms. Now, you can watch live and unedited footage of happy free-range chooks to make sure that it’s up to the standards you demand.

“We want our customers to see first-hand the life led by the happy, healthy hens who produce our free-range eggs,” said Julie Proctor from Australian-owned Sunny Queen Farms.

“Until now, some free range egg customers have been unsure about what ‘free range’ means. We can’t speak for all free-range but we’re proud of our Sunny Queen Free Range Farms, and what better way to show off our pampered chooks than to give everyone a bird’s eye view with our new, live action webcam.”

Currently, Australia doesn’t have a national legally enforceable standard for free-range eggs, so the conditions that ‘free-range’ chickens live in vary considerably. To keep informed on which labels you can trust, visit www.animalwelfarelabels.org.au.

To get an eye full of the Sunny Queen’s free-range chooks frolicking via the Eggcam at www.sunnyqueen.com.au/eggcam.

“The live EggCam has been set up so people can see everything that the girls get up to when they are out and about - from the moment they hit the paddock and start foraging until they’re brought back into the barn at dusk to get their beauty sleep.”

“We cater to their every whim, open fields by day, great food and service, nests to lay their eggs in, plus warm, safe barns to rest in at night. Our girls are truly happy, contented hens who live and eat well,” Julie said. “And now our customers can see that for themselves.”

While this is a great initiative from Sunny Queen Farms, G believes it would be even better to see the removal of all their caged hens – which make up the majority of their produce – as well.